Spotlight Interview … Photographer / Teacher Ibarionex Perello

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JRP: Ibarionex Perello is the host of the very popular podcast “The CandidFrame” and is an instructor on Betterphoto.com. I feel fortunate to have gotten him away from his busy schedule to share his thoughts with this installment of JRP Blog.

Ibarionex Perello: James I’m grateful for the opportunity to appear on your blog. I’m a great fan of what you do here.

JRP: For those unfamiliar with your podcast where do you call home?

Ibarionex Perello: I live in Altadena, which is a small community north of Pasadena, California.

JRP: What sparked your interest in photography and do you have any formal training?

Ibarionex Perello: I was introduced to photography at 8 years old as a member of the Boys Club of Hollywood. I’m pretty much self-taught and spent endless hours looking at monographs, learning to see through the work of great photographers.

JRP: How did “The Candid Frame” develop and come into existence?

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Ibarionex Perello: I was working as the associate editor for Outdoor Photographer, PC Photo and Digital Photo Pro magazines when I discovered podcasting. I saw the many shows were focusing solely on equipment and I saw an opportunity to create a show that revolves on photography, the creative process. I taught myself how to record and upload episodes. Just enough to keep me out of trouble, hopefully.

JRP: What would I find in your camera bag for a typical shoot?

Ibarionex Perello: That’s really relative to the demands of a shoot. I always have my camera with me, which is usually attached to a 50mm f/1.4 lens. For a paid job, it can include two camera bodies, an assortment of lenses from wide angle to moderate telephoto zooms. Strobes or flash, reflectors, light stands. I try to work as lean as I can but increasingly I’m finding I need more and more to get the job done.

JRP: What lens does it seem you just can’t do without and why?

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Ibarionex Perello: That would be the 50mm f/1.4. If I had no other lens, I could make images and be happy with that one. It allows me to do everything, even under low-light conditions. It’s lightweight and a remarkably sharp, whether shooting Canon or Nikon. You can’t go wrong with having that in your bag.

JRP: Can you describe your digital work flow and the software you use.

Ibarionex Perello: I am a big fan of Adobe Lightroom 2.0. It allows me to catalog and organization tens of thousands of images easily. Keywording is essential for me because of the quantity of images I’m creating and managing. Increasingly, I’m incorporating plug-ins such as Nik Color Efex 3.0 as part of my workflow to optimize my images even before I open them in Photoshop, if at all.

JRP: Do you find yourself setting a lot of custom white balances when you shoot?

Ibarionex Perello: I typically use the white balance presets, rather than using the auto white balance. Auto white balance is too unreliable. I will do a custom white balance for color critical work. I want to get it right in-camera and save myself more work on the back end.

JRP: How do you go about printing your images?

Ibarionex Perello: I don’t do as much printing as I would like. My images are sent electronically to my clients and so I rarely need to actually make a hard copy. However, I am increasingly working on personal work and I look forward to returning to holding prints again. I truly miss that part of the process.

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JRP: What would you say is the most critical moment of image capture?

Ibarionex Perello: It’s the moment before the first image is made when I become aware of the light and the background. The failure to recognize what’s happening with the light and the background is often the biggest weakness in a photograph. It’s especially important with the light, because the exposure, white balance and contrast all play key roles in the success or failure of a photograph.

JRP: Do you have any special projects you are currently working on?

Ibarionex Perello: I’ve started a new video podcast called “Shooting with Alas” (http://www.shootingwithalas.com), which allows photographers to follow me during a shoot. It provides me an opportunity to not only provide some helpful information to other photographers, but also tell some good stories about interesting people.

JRP: What has been the best advice given to you by another photographer?

Ibarionex Perello: It’s something I’ve heard from so many photographers I’ve interviewed and that is that you have to have faith in what you’re doing, that you are meant to do this. It sees you through those challenging and dark times.

JRP: What advice would you share with photographers starting out?

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Ibarionex Perello: Have a camera with you always. It’s only through taking pictures, mostly bad pictures, that you eventually learn to see and make images that are worthwhile. A photographer has more failures than he does successes if you measure it frame by frame, but when it works it makes it all worthwhile.

JRP: Thank you Ibarionex for sharing your ideas and images with us. It has been a pleasure talking with you. We wish you continued success.

Ibarionex Perello: Thank you for providing me an opportunity to share my passion of photography with your readers. I appreciate it.

JRP: To listen to “The Candid Frame” link here: http://www.thecandidframe.com

To view more of Ibarionex Perello’s work and to checkout his classes follow these links:

http://www.lafotoboy.blogspot.com

http://www.ibarionex.com

http://www.shootingwithalas.com

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